Kim Ghattas

Kim Ghattas

Kim Ghattas is a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She is writing a book about the impact of the rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia on the wider region since 1979. Ghattas was the BBC’s State Department correspondent, traveling regularly with the U.S. Secretary of State between 2008 and 2013. She was part of an Emmy Award-winning BBC team covering the Lebanon-Israel conflict of 2006. 

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Elie Gardner

Elie Gardner

How have the past few days in Istanbul been for you?

I'm obviously very glad to be safe. I am a photo-journalist, but I do not typically cover news such as the Istanbul bombings. If there's an explosion or something, I’m usually not the journalist who is first on the scene and covering it. My experience so far has been shared with my roommates: I live with a Turkish girl and an American girl, and we've just been talking and sharing perspectives. You feel closer in those moments when you talk about this stuff. It sounds really sad, but you get used to it. I’ve lived in Istanbul for a year and a half, and I don’t feel less safe today than I did yesterday or the day before. You move on, you keep living.

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Francesca Cicardi

Francesca Cicardi

FREELANCE JOURNALIST AND FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT | CAIRO

You’re a freelance journalist based in Cairo. What does that entail?

Being a freelance journalist in Cairo means that you must always be alert and available: anything could happen at any time, in the most unpredictable moment and at the craziest hour of the day. This is true for all journalists but in particular for freelancers that work on their own and must be updated all the time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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Nathalie Reis

Nathalie Reis

DIRECTOR | NATHALIE REIS TRANSLATIONS

You have been an English to French translator for 18 years now. What does it entail?

Being a translator means working with written words (as opposed to spoken words for interpreting). Translating is transferring a text from one language into another language, in my case English into French, whilst respecting the style, the register and the content of the original text.

On a typical workday, after I have walked my dog for an hour, I start work at 9-ish and translate solidly until 1pm. Then I may do some marketing (replying to emails from potential clients) or some invoicing. I usually translate for another two hours in the afternoon.  

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Maha El- Metwally

Maha El- Metwally

CONFERENCE INTERPRETER

You’re a conference interpreter. What does that entail?

Conference interpreters make sure that everybody understands what everybody else is saying. To minimise delays, conference interpreters interpret ‘simultaneously’: they instantly interpret what they hear the speaker say. This means that conference interpreters listen and talk at the same time – and that requires special powers!

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Amanda Pike

Amanda Pike

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER | REVEAL

What does Reveal do?

Reveal is part of The Center for Investigative Reporting, one of the oldest non-profit investigative newsrooms in the country. We produce a weekly radio show “Reveal,” stories for our website revealnews.org, and a range of videos, from short news pieces to documentaries. We’ve collaborated with a bunch of other outlets, most recently Frontline, MSNBC, PBS NewsHour, The New York Times and Telemundo, to produce stories.

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Catherine Cheney

Catherine Cheney

WEST COAST GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT REPORTER | DEVEX

Tell us about Devex. How did you get involved?

Devex is a media platform for the global development community. I lived on the East Coast for ten years: throughout college, at my first job at Politico, and at NationSwell, a company that I helped start. I had a variety of roles for East coast- based media organisations and I also freelanced for Devex. I really liked their model, and I missed international news reporting. NationSwell was my first introduction to 'solutions journalism', but it was US focused. I freelanced for Devex as a way to keep engaged with international issues. When I was moving to the West Coast, I reached out to them and asked if they had any opportunities for me. At the time, they were actually looking for a West Coast correspondent that would be based in Seattle. But we mutually decided that it made a lot of sense to have the West Coast Reporter live in the Bay Area.

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Lisa Yuriko Thomas

Lisa Yuriko Thomas

SENIOR PRODUCER | AJ+

Tell us about AJ+. How is it different from Aljazeera English or Aljazeera America?

AJ+ is a digital only channel. We create content — primarily video — that informs and engages our millennial audience over social networks. I joined in October 2013, about one year before our formal launch, and the startup atmosphere we had then is still palpable today. My colleagues are incredibly committed to what they do every single day. They’re passionate about the world and to ensuring the voiceless get a voice. I’ve worked in several newsrooms, and I don’t think I have seen as much commitment and passion as I have seen here. The channel is built and driven by our diverse newsroom, and I think it really shows in our work. Our content is sassy, sometimes comical, sometimes quirky, and sometimes very serious. 

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Amy Walters

Amy Walters

PRODUCER | THE CENTER FOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING/REVEAL

You studied English at Earlham College in the US...

I actually did my last semester of college in Jerusalem, and after that, I got really interested in Journalism - it didn’t seem like there was any reason to stop. Now, I get a lot of calls from journalists who ask if I went to Graduate school. I think it really works for some people, but, looking at the student loan situation right now, it's really hard for me to recommend that people go to graduate school. Particularly for something like Journalism, which is something you can do just by practicing. 

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